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Sioux County Index-Reporter
Hull, Iowa
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November 2, 2016     Sioux County Index-Reporter
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November 2, 2016
 

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community 2 I Sioux County Index-Reporter November 2, 2016 re Wl go 'P0rn & Sexting: Can We Talk About This?' assembly presented June De Wit Writer jdew t@ncppub.corn Students and parents gath- ered Wednesday, Oct. 26, in the Boyden-Hull Theater in Hull for three separate assem- blies.The"Porn & Sexting: Can We Talk About This" assembly was led by speaker, Pastor Aaron Baart, dean of chapel at Dordt College in Sioux Cen- ter. Fifth grade through junior high students took part in the early afternoon assembly and the high school students' assembly concluded the af- ternoon. Parents attended a separate evening session. Baart has spoken on the sub- ject in schools in nine differ- ent states. Baart hoped to get stu- dents to understand the im- plications of even dabbling along the edges of pornogra- phy and explained, "Some of them don't even realize this could become an addictive behavio(.' Students turned in anony- mous questions that were identified only by their grade after their sessions. Baart compiled them and put them into slides to use for the par- ent presentation in the eve- ning. "Actually, parents have a lot of questions" said Baart. He explained to parents, 'q-his is what YOUR kids said today" He feels it is helpful for par- ents to know what their kids have questions about. It helps start a conversation with their kids. According to Baart, most high school students spend more time online and are more experienced than ju- nior high students because they have their own phones or devices. He explained ev- ery kid gets exposed to por- nography while they work on homework and he feels exposing kids to the dangers at a younger age is beneficial because it helps them make an informed decision when needed. Baart explained national trends show that the porn industry targets teenagers because they're the largest age group addicted to por- nography in the country. He explained national statistics show high pornography us- age in conservative areas such as northwest Iowa. Most people are afraid to come for- ward and get help, he said, "We don't live in a very grace- based culture. We're very shame-based here" Parenting today can be challenging and when you add technology to the mix, it becomes even more daunt- ing. "Raising children in to- day's information age is ex- tremely challenging as we are not as comfortable and acclimated as the students" explained Dan Pottebaum, Boyden-Hull Junior High/ High School principal. Understanding technol- ogy is part of the problem for parents who often get cell phones or other devices for their kids that they them- selves don't know how to work. 'qhey're embarrassed that they don't know the technology'explains Baart. Parents can do some basic things to educate themselves and be tech-savvy. Intemet communications services can put filters on to block pornographic information from coming through to your WALKING A THIN LINE Pastor Aaron Baart spoke to kids and parents at three assem- blies in the Boyden-Hull Theater in Hull Wednesday, Oct. 26. Baart spoke about the dangers and issues that arise from por- nography and how some students don't even realize they are walking a thin line when it comes to sexting. (Photo/June De Wit) home internet, sometimes for free. Set your home Wi-Fi with a timer to shut down at 10 p.m. each night. These simple ways don't require parents to be technology geniuses to protect their kids. Baart hopes his interac- tion with parents gives them enough information to have an informed conversation with their kids. He said they can go home and tell their kids, "1 saw what you saw" Then they can sit down and talk about it. Pottebaum feels since students have more access to technology, they should be educated on appropri- ate use. He feels laptops are a tool. "Tools can be used for construction or destruction," he said, comparing it to a hammer.They can be used to build or destroy, just as a ham- mer can. He wants to be sure students are taught appropri- ate use of these technology devices. The school hopes to empower their students and parents with this information. "Knowledge is power;',' Potte- baum explained. Few regulations protect kids from exposure to inter- net porn. Pottebaum wants to know, "Why is something so wrong and harmful to many people not regulated?" That's why he feels it's very impor- tant for parents to share their thoughts with their kids as they get their own devices and make some of their own decisions. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT Western Christian students have been busy practicing for their play, 'q'he Hound of the Baskervilles." Shown are Aysha De Groot, Emma Koele and Seth Hoekstra as they work through one of the scenes, getting ready for the big performances! (Photo/Submitted) The Western Christian High School Pack Players will present"The Hound of the Baskervilles: A Comic Thrill- er Starring Shirley Holmes and Jennie Watson" Thurs- day, Nov. 3, and Friday, Nov. 4, at 7 p.m. Set in 1889, the nieces of the famous duo Holmes and Watson must take on a case in their uncles' ab- sence. They are to investigate a curse and a possible mysterious haunting hound in the moors of England. Are the two college girls up for the challenge? There are laughs, mystery and suspense as Shirley Holmes and Jennie Watson play detectives instead of study- ing for exams. Based on Arthur Conan Doyle's famous novel, it's a night of comedy and mystery! Tickets can be reserved online at http://www.tutu- tix.com/WesternChristianHS or purchased at the door the evening of the performances. Call Western,_712- 439-1013, if you have any questions. in 'One Way' in concert Nov. 6 Tabernacle Baptist Church of George will be hosting "One Way" in concert Sunday, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. The event is open to the public and refreshments will be served following the performance. "One Way" quartet has been singing gospel concerts since 1990. The group is comprised of Ginger Nobles, Tim Mauldin, Mary Jo Huls, Marilyn Maurer and Craig Johnson. Each of the mem- bers has background in gospel singing and four of them are second-generation children of the Ambassador Quartet, also of George. A typical "One Way" concert is com- prised of southern gospel favorites -- both old and new. SIOUX COUNTY (USPS 497-320) Established as the Pattersonville Press by D.A.W. Perkins in February, 1879. Published as the Index since 1897. Published weekly at 1013/st Street, RO. Box 420, Hull, lowa, S 1239. Phone (712) 439-1075 or (712) 472-2525. Fax (712) 439-2001. e-mail hulleditor@ncppub.com. Periodicals postage paid at Hull. POSTMASTER: Send ad- dress changes to The Sioux County Index-Reporter, RO. Box 420, Hull, Iowa S 1239-0420. Jim Hensley ...................................... Chief Operating Officer Lisa Miller ..................................................... General Manager Jessica Jensen ............................................... Managing Editor June De Wit ........................................................................ Writer Jeanne Visser ....................................................................... Writer Lois Kuehl ................................ Advertising Representative Katie DeBoer ........................................................ Graphic Artist Katie Kelderman ................................................ Graphic Artist Megan Punt ......................................................... Graphic Artist OFFICE HOURS: 8"30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday - Friday Some of the second and third grade students in the Kids' Club program visited Aspen Heights last Thursday afternoon. They brought along bead crafts they had made and passed them out to the residents of Aspen Heights. I.eol;I II~lkl, er " Rosita Andres, a member of Kids' Club, hands a bead craft to Leona Bakker, who lives at Aspen Heights. The Kids' Club students made the crafts earlier, so they could share t2nem with people at Aspen Heights.